TRG-056 The Quiet Period

During a "Quiet Period" coaches may not watch players compete live or visit high schools.  Coaches are allowed to write and call players, however, face-to-face contact is only allowed on the college's campus.

Many programs will host "Junior Days" during quiet periods to get perspective student athletes on campus.

Use the quiet period as an opportunity to reach out and request unoffficial or official visits because you know coaches will be on campus.

The 2016-17 NCAA D-I baseball recruiting calendar has two "Quiet Periods".   The first quiet period is only about three weeks from the middle of August through the first week in September.  The second quiet period begins after the early signing period in November and lasts all winter until the end of February (with an exception for the January dead period). The quiet period is shown in "Yellow" (see images below). 

The NCAA D-II "Other Sports" recruiting calendar (which includes baseball and softball) only recognizes contact and dead periods. There are no quiet periods for D-II baseball and softball.

D-III, NAIA, and NJCAA recruiting calendars do not recognize quiet periods.

You can find more on recruiting periods at the NCAA website:  http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars

For an actual "wall calendar" presentation go to http://on.ncaa.com/2l3Vccg and click on the correct Division, Sport, & Year.

 

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TRG-055 The Evaluation Period

First of all, baseball and most other sports do not have an "Evaluation Period" as part of their recruiting calendars.  At the D-I level, evaluation periods are only used in men's football and basketball as well as women's basketball, softball and volleyball.  At the D-II level it's only football and basketball (men's and women's) that have "Evaluation Periods".  D-III and NAIA programs do not recognize evaluation periods.

Although it's not shown in blue on their recruiting calendar, NCAA D-I softball has an "Evaluation Period" during each state's regional and state championship competition.  These dates obviously fluctuate  so that can't be shown on the calendar.

An "Evaluation Period" is similar to a contact period with the exception that coaches can not have face-to-face contact with players or their families unless it is on the college campus.  During the "Evaluation Period" coaches can attend student-athletes’ sporting events and visit their high schools, however they cannot have any in-person conversations or contact.

There are limits by sport regarding the number and nature of evaluations that coaches are allowed.  We will address this topic in a later post. 

You can find more on recruiting periods at the NCAA website:  http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars

For an actual "wall calendar" presentation go to http://on.ncaa.com/2l3Vccg and click on the correct Division, Sport, & Year.

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2016-17 Men's Basketball Recruiting Calendar - Showing an official "Evaluation Period" in blue. 

2016-17 Men's Basketball Recruiting Calendar - Showing an official "Evaluation Period" in blue. 

TRG-054 The Contact Period

The backbone of any quality recruiting plan has to be the recruiting calendar.  The recruiting calendar was put in place to keep coaches from having constant access and overwhelming sought after after recruits. Having an understanding of what coaches can do at different times of the year is important.  

During a "Contact Period" all recruiting activities are allowable.  Coaches can have face-to-face contact with players and their families, watch players compete live, visit their high school, as well as write or call players.  There are no limitations for coaches during these periods except those related to your current grade in school.  

Using the 2016-17 NCAA D-I recruiting calendar, the "Contact Period" for baseball runs from the beginning of March through the early singing period in November with a few of exceptions.  The contact period is shown in "Green" (see images below).  This encompasses the traditional spring, summer, & fall baseball seasons.

The NCAA D-II "Other Sports" recruiting calendar (which includes baseball and softball) only recognizes dead periods.  By default, this makes all other dates "Contact Periods".

You can find more on recruiting periods at the NCAA website:  http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars

For an actual "wall calendar" presentation go to http://on.ncaa.com/2l3Vccg and click on the correct Division, Sport, & Year.

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TRG-053 The Recruiting Calendar Explained: Recruiting Periods

Ask any high school player, "What is the current recruiting period?" and you will most likely get a blank look.  Prospective student athletes and their families just don't know.  Many of them don't even know there is a recruiting calendar let alone multiple recruiting periods.

it is imperative that you learn about the recruiting calendar and the various recruiting (or contact) periods so you not only know what you should be doing as an athlete during the recruiting process but you understand what college coaches are doing at any particular time of the year.

There are four (4) periods of recruiting activities that make up the NCAA Recruiting Calendar:

(1) Contact Period,

(2) Evaluation Period,

(3) Quiet Period, &

(4) Dead Period.

The recruiting periods for each sport can vary greatly.  The various recruiting periods define what coaches are allowed to do in the recruiting process at that time.  We will provide a brief overview of each recruiting period here and spend some more in-depth time on each in later articles.

During a "Contact Period" all recruiting activities are allowable.  Coaches can have face-to-face contact with players and their families, watch players compete live, visit their high school, as well as write or call players.

An "Evaluation Period" is similar to a contact period with the exception that coaches can not have face-to-face contact with players or their families unless it is on the college campus.

During a "Quiet Period" coaches may not watch players compete live or visit high schools.  Coaches are allowed to write and call players, however, face-to-face contact is only allowed on the college's campus.

During a "Dead Period" coach's may not have any face-to-face contact with players and their families.  In addition, they can not watch players compete live.  However, coaches are still allowed to write or call players.

You can find more on recruiting periods at the NCAA website:  http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/resources/recruiting-calendars.

Goal:  Gain an understanding of the four recruiting periods so you can plan your yearly recruiting activities.

Are you being recruited?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TRG-052 The Recruiting Calendar

In a recent interview with a college player, he revealed that during his high school playing career he was not aware of the early signing period.  He didn't even know it existed.  He tried to act like it wasn't a big deal and that he didn't need the hype of signing day.  This young man didn't start the recruiting process until after his high school senior season. Needless to say, he walked on at a local D-II school without any scholarship money.

It's vitally important that you understand the NCAA Recruiting Calendar.  To win "The Recruiting Game", you need to understand the key dates and deadlines.  If you don't know when these dates are then how can you put a plan in place to get recruited and sign a National Letter of Intent.

The NCAA makes a separate recruiting calendar for most sports because the dates and rules vary from sport to sport.  The NCAA also makes a separate calendar for Division I and II.  You will find 3rd party sites with recruiting calendars, but be aware they can be inaccurate or out of date.  Make sure you are looking at the current year.

The NCAA college recruiting calendars run from August 1st to July 31st.

The NCAA Recruitng Calendar is free!  You don't need a password or secret hand shake. You can find it in several places and several formats.

For an actual "wall calendar" presentation go to http://on.ncaa.com/2l3Vccg and click on the correct Division, Sport, & Year.

You can find a summarized recruiting calendar in a "table" format in the NCAA "Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete" on the NCAA website under the "Know before you go section: " http://on.ncaa.com/2l3UGLv .  You will have to download the pdf file.  In the 2016-17 version, the summary recruiting calendars can be found on page 27 of the guide.

Once you have the calendar it's time for a vocabulary test.  You will first need to learn about the various recruiting periods and what happens during this time in the recruiting process.  We will discuss these more in a later post.

With multiple calendars for different divsison and various sports, it can very quickly become confusing.  Make sure you have the correct calendar!  Most players will have to juggle multiple calendars because they will be recruited by Division I & II schools.

The recruiting calendar should be a foundational document in putting together your recruiting plan.  By understanding the various recruiting periods you will not only learn what you should be doing, but you also gain insight into how college coaches are spending their time.

Goal:  Obtain a copy of the current year recruiting calendar for your sport(s) and projected playing level. Begin the process of learning about the various recruiting periods.

 

Are you being recruited?

 

 

 

 

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TRG-051 Want to learn something? Ask an expert!

If you want to get better, seek help from someone who has experience and has been where you want to go.   I recrntly spent the day with JR Perdue who is a pitching instructor for the Chicago White Sox.  JR also has collegiate experience as a junior college coach.  JR was running a pitching clinic at 1st University's indoor baseball facility.  Players of all ages came to hear the expert.

JR is responsible for many big league pitching careers.  He shared example after example of guys who listened to advice, made changes, and moved their careers up though the minors and into the big leagues.  Players who want to win at baseball seek out opportunities to learn from experts.  

Do you want to win "The Recruiting Game"? Do something about it today!  

If you don't know where to begin the recruiting process, contact us and learn what to do.  

If you feel like you are behind and your teammates and friends are getting offers, reach out to us let us help you get on track. 

If you are just lost and want to understand the recruiting process, let us help you jump start your efforts.

Players and parents: Sign up for our recruiting seminar and start writing your own recruiting story.

Coaches: Contact us and let us customize a seminar to meet the needs of your specific age group (travel, rec, high school).

Goal:  If you don't have recruiting experience, seek expert advice today.

Are you being recruited? 

 

 

TRG-050 It's a numbers game.

Everyone agrees that building an initial target list of potential schools (we like to call it your "Draft Board") is one the first steps in your recruiting process.  However, many disagree on how many schools should be on your Initial Draft Board.  Some will say focus on 10-15 schools.  Other say to expand that number to 20-30.  We believe it's a simple numbers game.  How many roster spots do want to compete for?  Let us explain.

A typical college freshman recruiting class will have an average of about 9 roster spots.  If you contact 10 schools you would think you are competing for 90 roster spots.  Not bad odds.  However, each of the roster spots are assigned to meeting the needs of the program.  The needs will vary from year to year but for our example we will assume that each school is looking for 3 RHP, 2 LHP, 1 C, 2 OF, and 1 MI.  If you are an outfielder, you are actually only competing for 20 roster spots.  With close to 140,000 high school seniors playing baseball, These are not very good odds.

For this reason, we recommend assigning at least 100 schools to your Initial Draft Board.  Given the previous scenario, with 100 target schools an outfielder is now competing for 200 roster spots.  We like those odds much better!

There are many other factors in creating this Initial Draft Board.  For example, if you are starting the recruiting process as a senior, you are late in the game.  You will have to reduce your target list significantly because you will simply not have enough time to filter all these schools.  As a freshman, you have more than enough time to filter through 100 schools.

Goal:  Put the odds in your favor by expanding your Initial Draft Board so you can compete for more roster spots.

Are you being recruited?

 

 

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TRS-049 Is it too late to get recruited?

It's never too late to start to the recruiting process, however, the longer you wait the less opportunities you will have. Many seniors who have not prepared for the recruiting process find themselves in a tough spot.  They have not learned how the recruiting process works and have fallen for the myth that if they are good enough coaches will find them.  When no one called, they were discouraged and thought it wasn't going to happen for them.

The good news is that we hear recruiting stories from players all the time that are able to find roster spots at all levels (including Division-I) during and even after they finish playing their senior season.  Some even get limited scholarships, however, these situations are rare. There are many circumstances that may open roster spots.  Some programs may lose recruits that originally committed to them, have players that unexpectedly sign professional contracts, or even have players transfer.  These unexpected openings create opportunities for seniors who get on the ball and get started. 

Although roster spots and limited scholarship dollars may still be available late in the recruiting game, you may have to play at a level below your skill sets.  There is a natural order to the recruiting process.  Division-I schools select from the pool of nationally recruited players. As players begin to commit between their freshman and junior years, this fills the Division-I recruiting classes.  Players who did not receive offers begin to look at D-II opportunities. As this process continues to trickle down, D-III, NAIA, & NJCAA coaches fill out their rosters later in the recruiting game and have the most opportunities for unsigned seniors.  While you may have Division-II corner infielder talent, by starting the recruiting process so late you may only be able to find a roster spot on a D-III or NAIA team.

So what do you do?  Don't worry about what you haven't done.  Focus, make a plan, and get started today! 

Starting late also means you have to squeeze a 4-year process into several months.  This requires a carefully thought-out action plan.  You will have to start by significantly narrowing your "Draft Board" or target school list.  You will need to focus on schools that you know you can play at & also gain admission.  For example, we recommend that freshman starting the recruiting process create a initial target list of 100 schools.  We recommend that seniors who are starting the recruiting process limit their target list to only 30-50 schools and quickly reduce that number based on the initial interest they receive.  There simply isn't enough time to do it the right way.

Starting late also is problematic because the admissions application process for many schools begin in the fall and winter of your senior year before you are able to play your senior season.  This may require you to apply to multiple schools so you don't lose out on other scholarships because you applied late.  Be proactive and stay on top of the admissions process.

The Bottom Line: There are roster spots for seniors who can play the game, but, you have to get it in gear and find out how the win "The Recruiting Game".  Start today and contact us about attending one of our recruiting seminars.

Are you being Recrited?

 

 

TRS-048 Are You Bring Recruited?

Seems like a simple question, but you would be surprised how many current high school players don't know the answer.  We ask this same question to all of the players that come to us for help.  Are you being recruited?  I have received many answers to this question.  Most younger players correctly answer, "No".  However, many older players who should already be knee-deep in the recruiting process pause, stutter, and then say something like, "I've got some interest from some schools."  Probing further I ask, "what does 'interest' mean?" The standard reply is,  "I got a letter from State University asking me to come to their baseball camp."  Little does this athlete know that they and 1,200 other regional players also got that same letter.

The NCAA has a high standard when it comes to who they consider a recruited athlete.  The NCAA Division I Manual defines a Recruited Prospective Student-Athlete:  "Actions by staff members or athletics representatives that cause a prospective student-athlete to become a recruited prospective student-athlete at that institution are:

  1. Providing the prospective student-athlete with an official visit;
  2. Having an arranged, in-person, off-campus encounter with the prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s parents, relatives or legal guardians;
  3. Initiating or arranging a telephone contact with the prospective student-athlete, the prospective student athlete’s relatives or legal guardians on more than one occasion for the purpose of recruitment; or
  4. Issuing a National Letter of Intent or the institution’s written offer of athletically related financial aid to the prospective student-athlete."  (DI Manual 13.02.14.1)

So, have you been invited for an official visit?  Have you had an arranged meeting with a coach off campus?  Have you been personally called by a coach more than once?  Have you issued a NLI or written scholarship offer?  You can see where I am going here.  If not, you are still just a "prospective student athlete".

GOAL: Make the transition from a "Prospective Student Athlete" to a "Recruited Prospective Student Athlete"!  Find out how by enrolling in one of our recruiting seminars where we discuss we discuss this topic. 

Are you being Recuited?